About | New Releases | Movie & TV Rights | Books | How to Order | Print Catalog | Home
Sunstone Press www.sunstonepress.com
  Featured Books: Fiction / Native American
 
AMERICA’S SECRET WEAPON
Navajo Code Talkers of World War II
By Ann Stalcup

For a long time Ann Stalcup has been fascinated by the role that the over 300 Navajo Code Talkers played in the Pacific during World War ll. Although all the facts are true, this story is a fictionalized account of the Code Talkers—America’s Secret Weapon. There is increased urgency in telling their story in a way that young people, as well as adults, can understand and appreciate. The author interviewed four of the original “talkers” in Arizona and New Mexico before writing this book and was impressed with their courage, graciousness, and desire to share their story. For twenty-three years following the war, their unbroken code had remained a secret. Not even their families were permitted to know the part they had played in fighting the war. This inspiring story focuses for the most part on one man, but it is the experience of every code talker’s dangers and triumphs. Recognition of their contribution was a long time coming.

As a teenager the author planned for a career in ballet or art. Unable to decide between the two, she became an educator in England, Canada, and California. Ann Stalcup is the author of seventeen books, fifteen of which are nonfiction. All but two are for children of various ages while two work equally well for both adults and children. She has also written numerous articles and stories for children’s magazines. Fifteen of her books were inspired by the over 150 countries she has visited.


Softcover:
6 X 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-176-4
60 pp.,$16.95


CORN FLOWER IN BLOWING SNOW ON THE GREAT PLAINS
Third in a Fiction Series Based on the Four Seasons
By James D. Lester, Jr., PhD

Corn Flower, an eleven-year-old Native American girl, is a member of the Kansa tribe living along the Cottonwood River in the 1820s. When winter arrives on the Great Plains, Corn Flower and her best friend Night Sparrow build a sled to challenge their brothers in a hillside race. Because of the icy temperatures, many activities such as bead making, storytelling, and completing the winter count for the yearly history of their tribe remain in their family lodge. As the ice pack hardens, the children participate in the snow snake as they throw a long rod or stick down a narrow channel in the snow. When a stray coyote attacks Corn Flower and her goat along the river, she is saved by her horse Brownie. Along with her father and brothers, Corn Flower travels to the trading post. On her return home, Corn Flower is startled to find that the tribal storyteller Walks at Night has fallen in the snow. Corn Flower nurses Walks at Night back to health by using her wild crafting skills with herbs and roots for healing. At the shell ceremony Corn Flower and Night Sparrow each receive a new shell on their necklace for surviving their twelfth winter season on the Great Plains. Includes Readers Guide.

James D. Lester, Jr., PhD is a veteran English instructor with over thirty-seven years of experience as a secondary teacher at Alpharetta High School and a college instructor at Gwinnett Technical College, both located near Atlanta, Georgia. He is also the author of the popular texts Writing Research Papers, 16th edition and The Research Paper Handbook, 4th edition. In this third in his series based on the four seasons, Lester has again tapped into his unique outlook about the joys and challenges of Native American life in Kansas during the early 1800s. Much like children in modern culture, Corn Flower pursues an endless quest for adventure as she cherishes the closeness of her family and the fun times and trials that she faces with her best friend Night Sparrow.

Secure Movie & TV Rights

Softcover:
6 X 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-273-0
118 pp.,$16.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-580-8
118 pp.,$4.99


CORN FLOWER ON THE GREAT PLAINS
Second in a Fiction Series Based on the Four Seasons
By James D. Lester, Jr., PhD

In this second book in the series based on the four seasons, Corn Flower, an eleven-year-old Native American girl and a member of the Kansa tribe living along the Cottonwood River in the 1820s, is proud that her father White Plume has been selected as a tribal chief. With the guidance of two older tribal women, she also takes great pride in learning the skill of wild crafting to find herbs, roots, and leaves to use as medicines. After the harvest celebration of the corn crop, the members of the tribe head out to hunt for the great, shaggy bison. With the success of the hunt, much meat is prepared by all members of the tribe for the cold, winter months. One day while tending her herd of goats, Corn Flower and her best friend Night Sparrow find a stray horse wearing a saddle alone on the prairie. To discover the owner, Corn Flower and Night Sparrow travel to the trading post with their fathers White Plume and Red Branch. After leaving the trading post, Corn Flower nearly drowns while trying to return the lost horse at the nearby soldier fort. Saved by her father, she listens to White Plume’s story of how he came to know Kicking Swan and married her. The whole tribe rejoices with a naming celebration for a little girl of the tribe and for the marriage of Corn Flower’s brother Wanji to the maiden Running Dove. The story ends with the first heavy snowfall and a fun time in the winter whiteness with her brothers Red Cloud and Two Bears. Includes Readers Guide.

James D. Lester, Jr., PhD, is a veteran English instructor with over thirty-five years of experience as a secondary teacher at Clarksville High School and a college instructor at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tennessee. He is also the accomplished author of the popular texts Writing Research Papers, 16th edition and The Research Paper Handbook, 4th edition. For this second book in the series based on the four seasons, Corn Flower on the Great Plains, and the first in the series, Corn Flower, A Girl of the Great Plains, Lester has again tapped into his unique outlook about the joys and challenges of Native American Life in Kansas during the early 1800s. Much like children in modern culture, Corn Flower holds an endless quest for adventure as she cherishes the closeness of her family and the fun times and trials that she faces with her best friend named Night Sparrow.

Secure Movie & TV Rights

Softcover:
6 X 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-250-1
112 pp.,$16.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-570-9
104 pp.,$4.99


CORN FLOWER, A GIRL OF THE GREAT PLAINS
First in a Fiction Series Based on the Four Seasons
By James D. Lester, Jr., PhD

Corn Flower, an eleven-year-old Native American girl, is a member of the Kansa tribe living along the Cottonwood River in the 1820s. She is a loyal daughter to her parents White Plume and Kicking Swan. Corn Flower and her best friend Night Sparrow are in charge of each family's herd of goats. Together they sing the “Song of the Kansa,” find excitement in their simple life, and delight in the folk tales spoken by an elderly tribal storyteller. Corn Flower enjoys the thrill of adventure as she travels with her father to a nearby trading post.

Once she returns home, her happiness is short-lived as a tornado sweeps toward their village with a great wind. Corn Flower saves a baby goat and barely escapes the storm. The late summer brings horrible heat and a swarm of grasshoppers. Relief finally comes when a huge thunderstorm sweeps the grasshoppers away, yet the lightening from the storm sparks a fire on the prairie. Fortunately, their village is spared, and Corn Flower returns to her hillside in the remaining days of summer to tend her goats and again sing the “Song of the Kansa” with her special friend Night Sparrow.

Much like children in modern culture, Corn Flower cherishes the closeness of her family, fun with her best friend, and the endless quest for adventure.

James D. Lester, Jr., PhD, is a veteran English instructor with over thirty-five years of experience as a secondary teacher at Clarksville High School and a college instructor at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tennessee. He is also the author of the popular texts Writing Research Papers, 16th edition and The Research Paper Handbook, 4th edition. For Corn Flower: A Girl of the Great Plains, Dr. Lester has tapped into a new interest with a story about the joys and challenges of Native American Life in Kansas during the early 1800s.

Includes Readers Guide

Secure Movie & TV Rights

Softcover:
6 X 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-219-8
104 pp.,$16.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-546-4
104 pp.,$4.99


A FLASH IN TIME
By Michael K. Shay

Includes Readers Guide. See "Praise for this Book" below.

Order from Sunstone Press: (505) 988-4418

Forced to go on a hiking trip with his Uncle Jack, fourteen-year-old Zach Walker heads to the desert near Bluff, Utah to search for an ancient staircase—the same one Zach’s father was looking for when he disappeared three years before. Once in the backcountry, Zach discovers prehistoric ruins, mysterious rock art, and a one-way portal to the past. When he steps through the portal, he finds himself trapped in the land of the Ancestral Puebloans—a place hit hard by severe drought and conflict. Zach soon runs out of food and water, but a native girl named Aqua rescues him and takes him to her village where her family adopts him. But the canyons are full of warfare and Zach wants to go home, despite his growing attachment to Aqua and her family. The problem is, nobody in Aqua’s village seems to know the way back to the twenty-first century. Will Zach spend the rest of his life in a land eight hundred years before his time? How will he ever find his way back to family and friends in Portland, Oregon?

Michael Shay is a former elementary and middle school educator. He travels extensively in the Southwest—hiking, studying archaeology, and learning about the people who came before us. Michael’s favorite places to hike are the canyons near Bluff, Utah, where this story takes place. There, if you listen carefully while walking on canyon rims, you may hear the voices of the Old Ones or songs from their wooden flutes still lingering in the bone-dry air.

Secure Movie & TV Rights

Softcover:
6 X 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-141-2
132 pp.,$16.5

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-483-2
132 pp.,$4.99


THE FRENCH COMANCHE
A Novel
By Stanley T. Noyes

A boy’s tutor retells his search for the boy for seven years after he is kidnapped by the Comanches in this historical novel set in the late 1700s.

Arsène, the young son of the governor of French Louisiana, disappears in a blizzard on a trading trip in Comanche territory in 1789. For seven years, Jean-Pierre, the boy’s tutor and guardian at the time of his disappearance, searches for him on trading trips into comanchería. At last he finds him, only to discover that he has become a Comanche warrior now known as Amabate (The One Without A Head). Amabate returns to Fort St. Jean Baptiste de Natchitoches, Louisiana Territory, for a reunion with his father, but cannot be convinced to stay. “I am Comanche!” he exclaims.

Over the years, Amabate makes unannounced visits to his father’s home, sometimes with Comanche friends and relations, always painted and dressed as a warrior. Meanwhile, Amabate has joined a small band of “wolves,” braves who pledge never to back away from a battle as they roam the plains and ranges west into the mountains of New Mexico. Later he takes three wives and eventually he becomes White-Bear, a respected Comanche chieftain.

As an elderly man, Jean-Pierre tells the story of Arsène and his two worlds in a colorful combination of French, Comanche, Spanish, and English. He reflects on the verities of human relationships, his love for Arsène and for Arsène’s father, for the Comanche girl who was for a time Jean-Pierre’s wife, for his French wife, and for his Comanche “brothers.” Set in an authentic historical framework, the narrative explores the mores of two distinct cultures between the 1780s and the 1820s. We learn about the commerce of their days: stolen and traded ponies, war parties, battles with the Osage, love trysts, acts of bravery and revenge, prescient leaders, and prophetic dreams. The French Comanche is grounded in the dramatic sweep of history. The traders’ lives are affected by the French and Indian Wars, the American and French revolutions, Napoleon Bonaparte’s annexation of La Louisiane, and the Louisiana Purchase by the United States. The Comanches, ranging outside of “civilization,” are vulnerable to weather, illness, trade, enemy raids, and, as White-Bear foretells toward the end, the influx of American settlers.

Stanley T. Noyes grew up in California and was a writer, educator, and art’s administrator. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Army in the Ruhr campaign in a reconnaissance troop. They crossed the Rhine ahead of U.S. forces and later liberated slave labor camps. He was awarded the Bronze Star. When he returned he attended the University of California, Berkeley where he met and married fellow student Nancy Black in 1949 and earned his B.A. and M.A. degrees. For sport he rode bareback horses and bulls in rodeos in California and Nevada. Later Stan taught college at Cal extension and California College of the Arts. He lived in France with his family for about six years.

They moved to Santa Fe in 1964 and he taught at the College of Santa Fe, and briefly at the University of New Mexico. He later was a program director for the New Mexico Arts Division. Stan was a published author of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, notably Los Comanches, The Horse People, 1751–1845, a history of the Comanche Indians now from Sunstone Press in a new edition. Noyes was an avid hiker in the mountains of New Mexico often accompanied by his wolf hybrids. He spent many summers hiking the Pyrenees with his family and close French and Spanish friends.

Secure Movie & TV Rights

Softcover:
7 x 10
ISBN: 978-1-63293-257-0
298 pp.,$28.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-572-3
298 pp.,$4.99


GRANDMOTHER TELLS A STORY
Mimbres Children Learn Responsibility
By Carilyn Alarid and Marilyn Markel

Little One’s eyes are round and his mouth open as he and his cousins listen to stories told by their grandmother. Stories about Coyote and Roadrunner, Turkey and Turtle, and exciting tales from the Mimbres world are shared with delight. Tall Boy was attacked by a bear. Little One was almost bitten by a rattlesnake. A mountain lion is high up in a tree, watching Sleeps Too Much. Grandmother helps the village children develop their creativity and imaginations, connect to their history, their traditions, their families, and each other through stories. The children learn good character traits and cultural values through stories that will be told and retold, passing them down through generations. In this story the Mimbres children learn to take responsibility to tell their own amazing stories. This is the sixth book in a series to teach good character traits. Teachers, librarians, parents, and children of all ages will enjoy this pictorial narrative.

Twin sisters, Carilyn Alarid and Marilyn Markel are dedicated to helping children learn to have respect for the individual and cultural differences of all people. Carilyn is a member of the ‘Friends’ group and supports the Coronado Historic Site in Bernalillo, New Mexico, and the Mimbres Culture Heritage Site (MCHS) in Mimbres, New Mexico. Marilyn is the education coordinator for the MCHS, where she gives tours to school children and adults, focusing on the increasing need to preserve and protect southwest New Mexico’s cultural heritage. Born and raised in New Mexico, these sisters have the utmost respect for native cultures both past and present. Their previous books in the “Mimbres Children” series, Old Grandfather Teaches a Lesson, Talks All Day Has the Courage to Speak, Hits With His Fist Gives a Helping Hand, Thinks a Lot Has Her Head in the Clouds, and Runs Like The Wind Stops in her Tracks, all published by Sunstone Press.


Softcover:
6 x 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-350-8
92 pp.,$16.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-635-5
92 pp.,$3.99


MEDICINE WOMAN'S REVENGE
The Life and Times of an Apache Woman
By Bud Shapard

Order from Sunstone: (505) 988-4418

In 1866, a Chiricahua Apache girl, Dah-zhonne, was eleven years old when a Mexican army unit attacked and decimated her band’s village. The horrible affair changed her life forever and she swore vengeance on the Mexican colonel, Lorenzo Garcia, who led the attack. Orphaned in the massacre, Dah-zhonne was rescued by American troops and adopted by an army surgeon, Jack Morgan. Morgan and his wife, Mary, soon moved to Philadelphia with the Indian girl they renamed Jada Morgan. Jada lived the upscale life of a wealthy young woman; apprenticed in Dr. Morgan’s medical practice; and received her MD degree from the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. After two failed love affairs, she returned to the Southwest and became involved in a series of thrilling but sometimes dangerous adventures. Forced into Mexico by tribal dissidents where she was captured by Garcia, the man who killed her parents years earlier, she faces a lifetime as the colonel’s sex slave. But Jada escapes with six other women, and this daring breakout brings more unexpected dangers than they imagined. Includes Readers Guide.

Association with a Chiricahua Apache family for 19 years gives Bud Shapard an exceptional insight into Apache history and culture. His background in Indian history and culture was honed as the Research Services Officer for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. After his retirement to the North Carolina mountains in 1988, he spent his time writing. His first book, Chief Loco: Apache Peacemaker (University of Oklahoma Press, 2010), was the winner of the 2011 New Mexico Book Award for a Multi-cultural Subject.

Secure Movie & TV Rights

Softcover:
6 x 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-097-2
254 pp.,$22.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-441-2
254 pp.,$4.99


MYTHS OF MAGICAL NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN INCLUDING SALT WOMAN STORIES
By Teresa Pijoan, PhD

Myths of Native American spiritual women found throughout the Americas retold by well known American Southwestern professor, lecturer and storyteller.

Order from Sunstone Press: (505) 988-4418

Myths allow us to experience and find a meaning for life through different cultures. Myths resonate within us, bringing an experience of existing within a dissimilar reality. The Native American storytellers who shared their myths with the author were taught by their Elders who lived in a place and culture altered from that of today. These myths were told and recorded by the author with the understanding they would not be lost. Some of these myths were found to be almost lost, some to be very old, almost forgotten. The Salt Woman stories are difficult to find. They are very old and come from several cultures and diverse tellers. Other myths are from New Mexican Pueblos, Southeastern Creek, Lakota, Cheyenne, Hopi and Guiana cultures.

Teresa Pijoan was born in Espanola, New Mexico, and grew up in Indian communities where she learned the ways and legends of the Native People. Her father was a public health doctor from Barcelona and her mother was a school teacher from New York. Her grandfather was the famous Spanish author, Jose Pijoan. Teresa Pijoan is a lecturer, storyteller, research writer, and teacher. She has shared her storytelling throughout Central Europe, Mexico, and the United States. To storyteller Pijoan myths are “magic lenses” through which cultures can be viewed, understood, and deeply appreciated. Other books by Teresa Pijoan are Dead Kachina Man, American Indian Creation Myths, Native American Creation Stories of Family and Friendship, Granger’s Threat, Healers on the Mountain, Pueblo Indian Wisdom, and Ways of Indian Magic, all from Sunstone Press.

Secure Movie & TV Rights

Softcover:
6 X 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-249-5
84 pp.,$16.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-568-6
84 pp.,$4.99


PEYOTE WOLF
A Fernando Lopez Mystery
By James C. Wilson

Click on "Movie/TV Treatment" below.

A man in a wolf mask bursts into a teepee in the middle of a sacred ritual, a peyote ceremony, and kills Michael Soto, the owner of Sabado Indian Arts on the Santa Fe Plaza. The next morning Detective Fernando Lopez, a member of an old Santa Fe family, receives a complaint from two Zuni that an important tribal object, a carved wooden war god called an ahayu:da, has been stolen from their pueblo. They show him an anonymous letter sent to the Zuni Tribal Council saying that Michael Soto was trying to sell it for fifty thousand dollars. Shortly after they leave, the police dispatcher reports that Michael Soto has been murdered. Establishing what happened and who was present at the peyote ceremony proves difficult. One witness says three men and one woman from Whitewater near Zuni attended the ceremony. Another says it was four men from Whitewater. One witness blames a skinwalker or a werewolf for Michael Soto’s murder. Detective Lopez’s investigation exposes the cultural and ethnic fractures in Santa Fe, a city of Native American, Hispanic, and Anglo cultures. The investigation also leads into the dangerous underworld of buying and selling stolen Indian artifacts. Along the way he encounters looters and grave robbers, rich gallery owners who buy and sell priceless tribal objects on the black market, and artisans who produce fake replicas of the objects to sell. The search for answers comes to a startling end in a violent confrontation at a trading post just north of Zuni Pueblo, when the truth is finally revealed. Includes Readers Guide.

Emeritus Professor of English and Journalism at the University of Cincinnati, James C. Wilson lived in Santa Fe during the turbulent 1970s and wrote for the Santa Fe New Mexican and the Santa Fe Reporter. He has lived in Albuquerque since 2012. He is the author of seven previous books, including most recently Weather Reports from the Autism Front: A Father’s Memoir of his Autistic Son; Santa Fe, City of Refuge: An Improbable Memoir of the Counterculture; and Hiking New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon: The Trails, The Ruins, The History.

Secure Movie & TV Rights

Softcover:
6 x 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-307-2
176 pp.,$18.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-600-3
176 pp.,$3.99


SMOKESCREEN
A Fernando Lopez Mystery
By James C. Wilson

Click on "Movie/TV" Treatment below.

A prominent city councilmember, Tito Garcia, is assassinated at the beginning of the Santa Fe Fiesta. Known as a peacemaker, he had negotiated an agreement to ban a controversial Fiesta procession known as the Entrada. The procession celebrated the Reconquest of Santa Fe twelve years after the 1680 Pueblo Rebellion drove the Spanish out of Santa Fe. Both Spanish and Native American groups blame each other for Garcia’s murder and vow revenge. The situation explodes in violence when one Hispanic group attempts to march in downtown Santa Fe in violation of the agreement. Fernando Lopez is forced to rethink the case when he discovers Garcia’s involvement with Three-Hills Ranch, a compound suspected of sex-trafficking young women from border towns like Nogales and Juarez. The journey to find answers takes Lopez on a journey into the underbelly of wealthy Santa Fe society where deep cultural and ethnic conflicts have festered for over four hundred years. Smokescreen, the second in the Fernando Lopez Santa Fe Mystery Series, concludes in a fiery confrontation at Three-Hills Ranch, where the truth is finally revealed and justice served. Includes Reading Guide.

Emeritus Professor of English and Journalism at the University of Cincinnati, James C. Wilson lived in Santa Fe during the turbulent 1970s and wrote for the Santa Fe New Mexican and the Santa Fe Reporter. He has lived in Albuquerque since 2012. He is the author of eight previous books, including Hiking New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon: The Trails, The Ruins, The History (2019) and Peyote Wolf (2020), the first of the Fernando Lopez Santa Fe Mystery Series.

Secure Movie & TV Rights

Softcover:
6 x 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-315-7
174 pp.,$18.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-618-8
174 pp.,$3.99


THINKS A LOT HAS HER HEAD IN THE CLOUDS
Mimbres Children Learn About Fairness
By Carilyn Alarid and Marilyn Markel

Thinks A Lot has her head in the clouds, or does she? Thinks A Lot has seen animal shapes in the clouds since she was a little girl. She often saw images in the clouds that sometimes could not be seen by others. Grandfather told her it was a gift she could use to help her people. But, how? Grandmother chose Thinks A Lot to teach the small children of the village how to play and get along with each other. So Thinks A Lot began to teach the children to see images in the clouds and how to look for animal tracks. She thinks it is her work, but her cousins think is it just play. When does work become play, or play become work? In this story the Mimbres children learn an important lesson about fairness. Grandfather explains that equal and fair are not always the same thing. This is the fifth book in a series written to help children learn about good character traits. The children’s adventures are brought to life through the illustrations of everyday life as depicted on the pottery bowls by Mimbres artists of a thousand years ago. Teachers, Librarians, parents, and children of all ages will enjoy this pictorial narrative.

Twin sisters, Carilyn Alarid and Marilyn Markel are dedicated to helping children learn to have respect for the individual and cultural differences of all people. Carilyn is a docent at Coronado Historic Site in Bernalillo, NM. Marilyn is the education coordinator for the Mimbres Culture Heritage Site in Mimbres, NM, where she gives tours to school children and adults, focusing on the increasing need to preserve and protect southwest New Mexico’s cultural heritage. Born and raised in New Mexico, these sisters have the utmost respect for native cultures both past and present. Their other books in the “Mimbres Children” series, Old Grandfather Teaches a Lesson, Talks All Day Has the Courage to Speak, Hits With His Fist Gives a Helping Hand, Grandmother Tells a Story and Runs Like The Wind Stops in Her Tracks, all published by Sunstone Press.


Softcover:
6 x 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-300-3
108 pp.,$16.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-609-6
108 pp.,$3.99


WATER STORIES OF NATIVE AMERICAN AND ASIAN INDIANS
Legends of Rain, Rivers and Lakes
By Teresa Pijoan, PhD and Arun Chintaman Prabhune, PhD

The water legends in this book are from nomadic and settled groups of Native American and Asian Indians of rural India and have marked similarities. There are stories with local mythological and legendary themes covering historical as well as relatively recent periods. Each story highlights man’s life-threatening struggle with nature and, in particular, the water element. Readers will enjoy the similar stories and cultural references of two different native peoples and learn the different types of characters, personalities, traditional dresses, traditional foods, emotions, wishes, views, moral values, rituals, faiths, and beliefs from these two cultures. Everyone has their own legends and myths that help create an awareness of their own purpose, their own life and their personal character. These are stories for all ages to explore, believe and experience.

Teresa Pijoan, PhD, was born in Española, New Mexico, and grew up in Indian communities where she learned the ways and legends of the Native People. Her father was a public health doctor from Barcelona, Spain and her mother was a school teacher from New York. Her grandfather was the famous Spanish author, Jose Pijoan. Teresa Pijoan is a lecturer, storyteller, research writer, and teacher. She has shared her storytelling throughout Central Europe, Mexico, and the United States. She feels myths are “magic lenses” through which cultures can be viewed, understood, and deeply appreciated. Other books by Teresa Pijoan are Dead Kachina Man, American Indian Creation Myths, Native American Creation Stories of Family and Friendship, Granger’s Threat, Healers on the Mountain, Pueblo Indian Wisdom, Myths of Magical Native American Women Including Salt Woman Stories and Ways of Indian Magic, all from Sunstone Press.

Arun Chintaman Prabhune,PhD, was born in Maharashtra, India. Prabhune was inspired by history, mythology, and cultural study because of his father, a doctor who cared for rural people on horseback. He was professor of Marathi literature in Maharashtra and has been a visiting scholar at Stanford University. He is also a researcher, critic, writer, and a student of comparative folk literature, theatre and drama. Prabhune has published many Marathi language books in India, most recently Kitab-e-Navras. His books Mythological Marathi Drama: New Interpretations and Bear Folktales of American Indians have received awards from the state government of Maharashtra. Prabhune is an advisor to the prestigious Marathi literary periodical Akshar Wangmay and was a member of the editorial board of the Marathi literary periodical Pratishthan for two and half decades and the editor of Marathi literary periodical Akshar Yatra. He has published critical articles on comparative folk literature and drama literature.


Softcover:
6 x 9
ISBN: 978-1-63293-297-6
304 pp.,$22.95

eBook:
ISBN: 978-1-61139-587-7
304 pp.,$6.99


 
Home | Contact | Featured Books
SUNSTONE PRESS • Box 2321, Santa Fe, NM 87504-2321 • (800) 243-5644 www.sunstonepress.com